Archive for the ‘new media’ Tag

Kahn Acadamy

Sunday, March 20th, 2011

Great Video to generate some conversations about the ever changing approach to education.

Self Organizing Education

Wednesday, September 8th, 2010

Education scientist Sugata Mitra tackles one of the greatest problems of education — the best teachers and schools don’t exist where they’re needed most. In a series of real-life experiments from New Delhi to South Africa to Italy, he gave kids self-supervised access to the web and saw results that could revolutionize how we think about teaching.

(Synopsis taken from TED.com click here for site redirection)

Video from TED.com

Do you think the set up Sugata Mitra uses in his experiments would work in transforming traditional classrooms into technology rich research centers?

In states where end of grade testing determines content and subsequently the pacing of the content throughout the year, do you believe Sugata’s approach could be used to improve test scores and meet the annual yearly progress (APY) set forth by the Education bureaucracy?

Our Changing Brain

Friday, May 28th, 2010
Being involved in the exploration of using web 2.0 tools in classrooms as a part of inquiry based learning is really exciting. With all the instant gratification via quicker responses and more purposeful searching we may tend to believe we are actually doing more in depth work. Since we can scan, clip, note, save or post nearly anything we find instantly we may begin to feel somewhat like an authority in certain disciplines. However, this is not what research is telling us. The article I clipped the attached section from shares further information about brain research in the area of mapping neurological response of people as they interact with google based searches. Although there is a lot of brain activity, as measured by Whole Brain MRI machines, this does not mean that more is better. We may be making new connections but are the new connections beneficial? Will students benefit from web-based inquiry explorations? what do you think?
clipped from www.wired.com
What kind of brain is the Web giving us? That question will no doubt be the subject of a great deal of research in the years ahead. Already, though, there is much we know or can surmise—and the news is quite disturbing. Dozens of studies by psychologists, neurobiologists, and educators point to the same conclusion: When we go online, we enter an environment that promotes cursory reading, hurried and distracted thinking, and superficial learning. Even as the Internet grants us easy access to vast amounts of information, it is turning us into shallower thinkers, literally changing the structure of our brain.
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Heroic Games

Wednesday, May 19th, 2010

This video poses a very important question  about video games. Can we use online video games to solve real world problems? Jane McGonigal believes not only is it possible but she has created online games based around generating social networks around critical global issues. Make sure to watch the video to decide for yourself but here is what we (I watched this with two of my sixth grade classes today) think… the majority of the class believes that games can be used to solve world problems. What a hopeful group of students! These students have made good progress and although the other students may not believe in  the power of games it does not reflect their love of playing all sorts of games. As the rest of the classes  watch this today check back for comments and further thoughts.

Here are the links to the Games mentioned in the video:

Play it before you live it!

World Without Oil

Superstruct

Evoke

Check out the into video for Evoke.

Social networking for Minors

Wednesday, May 19th, 2010
One of the continuing trends in todays society is the use of social networking sites. Naturally the use of social networking is starting to make its way into the classroom. One of the emerging needs is etiquette on the web (webiquette). This article highlights a new site Togetherville that allows parents to utilize thier facebook connections to develop a network with their children and model proper online behaviors.
clipped from bits.blogs.nytimes.com
Togetherville allows parents to build a social circle for their children based on their own collection of Facebook friends. The children can then interact with the children of their parents’ friends, and specific adults that their parents have chosen, in a semi-private environment. The content on the site is curated, so children can play games, make art projects and watch or share videos, but everything they have access to has been vetted in advance, Mr. Dhillon said. Children can comment on their friends’ posts directly through drop-down menus of preselected phrases. If a user wants to say something that is not on the list, he can submit a request that it be added.
“We teach kids from a very early age, never let your identity be online, never let anyone know who you are, but we’re teaching some bad things,” he said. “Kids don’t learn how to be accountable.”  
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New Media Landscape

Friday, November 20th, 2009

As of late, learning has taken on a new direction for me. I was such a hunter and gatherer before in my approach to searching for information and was a very messy organizer with resources scattered over numerous sites and bookmarks restricted to one computer. I have now not only amalgamated my resource material but have also been able to feed updated content to me. As this journey progressed I felt there were new skills being developed, mostly due to the enormous headaches I got from diving deep into the web 2.0 style. While watching The New Media Literacies they discussed skills needed to be effective in this new media landscape. The first skill being judgment. Students need to be able to judge content and its value to answer their question or satisfy their search. Students should also be able to filter content as a means to disseminate information they feel is of value. Students should want to play and be engaged with not only the media and content but with the actual process of discovering the information. If its not the least bit entertaining who cares. Some of the more academic concepts discussed covered ideas like transmedia navigation were students seek out information from various sites and pull important details from the text and gather/generate media to supplement their work. Simulation is also important as an extension of real world experience as interaction is a crucial aspect of engagement with students. If a student doesn’t connect or they don’t feel the program offers valid content they will migrate to another site.

One aspect the video did not touch on directly is the concept of trans-media migration. The phenomenon as a group discovers new media sites and technologies and the time it takes from peer to peer contact to generate a user base and the time it takes before the site has to update their server due to influx of traffic. Sometimes migration can be instant as a form of web based positive peer pressure or it can take on the more embedded way of making its way through social networking. This is an are I am interested in and am exploring further